MoonDanceYoga

Yoga, Feldenkrais & Movement Therapy


Origins of the Feldenkrais Method(R)

So how did Moshe Feldenkrais, physicist and judo master come about developing his original method instead of moving on as a talented physicist with a promising future?

We do know about his debilitating injury to his knee and his stubborn, albeit well founded refusal to have conventional treatment with a risky surgery and instead going his own way, experimenting, learning, even meditating on it, using every bit of knowledge and tool at his disposal, including applying psychology and becoming one of the pioneers of mind/body approaches.

Continue reading


The Girl Missing Part of Her Brain and How She Healed with Feldenkrais(R) by Norman Doidge MD

“She will dance at her wedding”: Healing the girl born without part of her brain”

The following is annotated  excerpt from the full article published on Salon.com on Sunday, March 1, 2015

See how a parent’s nightmare turned into hope by Dr Moshe Feldenkrais’ intervention, continued support and the innovative approach he pioneered, the Feldenkrais Method®, when medical science had no hope or answers.

“A Girl Missing Part of Her Brain”

N Moshe Feldenkrais doing Functional Integration(R) or FI with a young child

“Feldenkrais’s approach can radically change the life even of people who were born missing huge parts of the brain, by facilitating differentiation in the remaining brain areas. Elizabeth, whom I (refers to N Doidge, MD, author)  interviewed, was born missing a third of her cerebellum, a part of the brain that helps to coordinate and control the timing of movement, thought, balance, and attention. Without the cerebellum, a person has difficulty controlling all these mental functions. The cerebellum, which means “little brain” in Latin, is about the size of a peach and is tucked under the cerebral hemispheres, toward the back of the brain. Although it occupies only about 10 percent of the brain’s volume, it contains almost 80 percent of the brain’s neurons. The technical name for Elizabeth’s condition is cerebellar hypoplasia, and there was no treatment known to change the course of the illness.”

The case of Elizabeth clearly points out that even a severely damaged brain is plastic, in other words, with proper stimulus, it can grow, learn and regain function, through a method of somatic education, as it was pioneered by dr Moshe Feldenkrais and is  known and practiced by Feldenkrais (R) practitioners and eloquently accounted for in Norman Doige’s new book, The Brain’s Way of Healing.

“When she was in the womb, her mother felt there might be a problem, because Elizabeth hardly moved. When Elizabeth was born, she didn’t move her eyes. They flickered and were not properly aligned, gazing in different directions. At one month, they rarely tracked objects. Her parents were terrified she might not see normally. As she developed, it was clear she had a problem with her muscle tonus. At times she was very floppy, meaning she had too little or no muscle tension, but at other times she had too much tension and was “spastic,” making no exploratory, voluntary movements. She received conventional physiotherapy and occupational therapy, but the treatments were painful for her.

Continue reading


Principles of Learning – Lessons and Practical Applications of the Feldenkrais Method, Episode #1

In the following video, recorded at TEDx Talks, professor Dorit Aharanov talks about the issues of learning, finding and implementing new ideas and the challenges of research. She draws a parallel of learning with the Feldenkrais Method(R) – a way somatic learning – reaching goals, extracting potential and quantum computation – her specific field of research -, that is universally applicable to learning, adapting, problem solving (neat math puzzle included) and better overall function in general. Continue reading